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Geilo Cabin

Set over 3,200 feet above sea level near one of Norway's premier skiing destinations, Geilo Cabin is built to withstand the harshest winter weather. Its facade is made from black-painted wood and black-tinted concrete, hiding within an inner courtyard created by the main area, guest house, and carport. The interior is similarly sparse, with black concrete floors, iron sulphate-treated oak, and a black fireplace, providing a stunning contrast with the natural landscape, especially during the winter months when the cabin is accessible by snowmobile or ski only.

Photos: Mark Goodwin / Lund Hagem

  • Camp Baird

    Located on 165 acres of Sonoma Valley, Camp Baird serves as a rustic retreat to escape from a family's urban dwelling. The compound is comprised of two structures, clad in weathered steel and slanted metal roofs, laid out in an L-shape. To maintain an authentic campground feel, most of the interior remains open to the outdoors, with a screened-in galley kitchen and dining area and an outdoor shower, while three enclosed spaces aren't limit by function and can be used for sleeping, lounging, or whatever need arises. Operating completely off-grid, the home is naturally cooled, heated by a pair of wood-burning stoves, and powered by solar panels. At the heart of the property, a massive deck explands out to an 82-foot-long lap pool and endless rows of live oak trees.

    Photos: Joe Fletcher / Malcolm Davis Architecture

  • Villa Meijendel

    Inspired by the sandy, woodsy parcel on which it sits, Villa Meijendel takes advantage of its location with a multi-level, partially sunk floorplan. You enter the home on the middle level, home to an office and two bedrooms. Above it lie the open kitchen and living spaces, while the bottom floor holds the master bedroom, as well as a garage and technical room buried in the sand. The main unpolished concrete structure dictates the flow between floors with gentle slopes, while the steel, wood and anodized aluminum are similarly left raw. The exterior is coated in burned wood, broken up only by the sizable windows that provide views to the dune valley beyond.

    Photos: Christian van der Kooy / VVKH Architecten