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1997 Porsche 911 GT1 Evolution

You're familiar with the iconic Porsche 911 line, but this 911 is nothing like the Porsche that comes to mind. Instead, this 1997 Porsche 911 GT1 Evolution is a racer, winning three consecutive Canadian GT championships between 1999 and 2001. It's one of only 14 GT1 race cars in private ownership and is the only ex-racing GT1 Evo to be legalized for street use. Available for sale publicly for the first time ever, this racing rarity can be yours from Sotheby's in May.

  • Lamborghini Centenario

    Created to celebrate the 100th anniversary of founder Ferruccio Lamborghini's birth, the Lamborghini Centenario is a powerful supercar that's even more exclusive than your average raging bull. Powered by a naturally aspirated V12, the Centenario has 770 hp at its disposal, enough to propel it from 0-62 in just 2.8 seconds on its way to a top speed of 217 mph. The monocoque and body are crafted from carbon fiber, helping to keep the body weight under 3,400 pounds, and the rear wing extends at high speeds to help with downforce and aerodynamics. Inside, there's plenty of carbon fiber and Alcantara, as well as a 10.1-inch touchscreen that supports Apple CarPlay so you don't miss a text, even when traveling at well over twice the speed limit. Limited to just 20 coupes and 20 roasters, all of which have already been spoken for.

  • Aston Martin DB11

    The first all-new Aston GT in over a decade — not counting Bond's DB10 from Spectre — the Aston Martin DB11 represents the first entry in the company's new direction and a bold entry into the supercar race. It's built on a bonded aluminium chassis and powered by a 5.2L twin-turbocharged V12 developed in-house and producing 600 hp. Paired to an 8-speed ZF transmission and one of several driver-selectable driving modes, it delivers a 0-62 time of 3.9 seconds and a top speed of 200 mph, in part thanks to aerodynamic trickery like uninterrupted roof strakes and a "virtual" rear spoiler that routes air from the base of the C-pillar through the body and out via an aperture in the decklid. The interior is fittingly upscale, with a 12-inch display for the instrument cluster, a centrally-mounted 8-inch screen for infotainment control, and contrasting leatherwork throughout.