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Cocoon House

Set in a string of row houses in Ho Chi Minh City's New Urban area, the Cocoon House maintains the original home's sloped roof silhouette while reimagining it as a modern abode. Extra space at the front and rear of the house afforded a garage in front and a kitchen/garden area out back, which is partially covered to create a terrace for the master bedroom above. It takes its name from the veneer of ventilation blocks that were installed on the old balconies at either end, adding both privacy and security while creating a green space for nature to enhabit.

Photos: Trieu Chien / Landmark Architecture

  • Little House on the Ferry

    Inspired by a series of sketches that showed the traditional summer house broken into multiple structures, the Little House on the Ferry is a modern multi-building seasonal hideout. The property on Vinalhaven Island in Maine sits next to a former quarry, creating an even more rocky landscape, and is home to three small buildings. The main space houses the living area, a bathroom, and the kitchen, and is connected to the other two buildings — which hold a single bathroom and bedroom each — by an exterior deck. All three were built in a factory using cross-laminated timber and hauled to the site, reducing both cost and impact, and use a system of sliding screens to provide privacy or alternately let in the views of Penobscot Bay.

    Photos: Trent Bell / GO Logic Architecture

  • Writers Cabins

    Designed for month-long residences away from technology and distractions, these Writers Cabins — officially known as the Diane Middlebrook Studios at the Djerassi Resident Artists Program — are ideal places to finish up a manuscript or flesh out your script. The four 280 square foot cabins sit facing south, west, and the Pacific Ocean, and are all skewed a few degrees from each other, with a steel canopy that joins them together. The exteriors are covered in unfinished red cedar, each cabin has its own private outdoor space, and the interiors offer great views thanks to the large, sliding glass doors.

    Photos: CCS Architecture