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Garmin Vivofit

It seems everyone and their mother is throwing their hat into the wrist-worn fitness tracker ring lately — and Garmin is no exception. The Garmin Vivofit ($170) is pretty typical as far as the competition is concerned, save one important feature. Its user-replaceable battery will last up to one year at a time, saving you from annoying recharges every couple of days. Meant to be worn at all times, it tracks your sleep as well as your physical activity, and has functionality that monitors how long you've been stationary, letting you know to get up and walk every hour. It's also water resistant, available in a range of colors, and syncs automatically to their online fitness community, letting you log miles, compete with friends, and more.

  • Bare Conductive Electric Paint

    Soldering is hard. Using Bare Conductive Electric Paint ($10 and up) is easy. This ingenious paint is nontoxic, solvent-free, water soluble, and most importantly conductive, allowing you to simply draw usable circuits on a variety of surfaces, including paper, plastic, fabric, and even conventional circuit boards. It comes in handy, easy-to-use tubes, as well as jars — for larger applications — and in a variety of sets that include instructions and materials for completing a variety of electronics projects.

  • ZeroHour Battery Backup Flashlight

    Sure, a flashlight is one of the most useful tools you can fit into your jeans pocket, but a flashlight that can also charge your most frequently-used gadgets — that's pretty remarkable. The ZeroHour Battery Backup Flashlight ($160) combines a 1,000-lumen CREE LED bulb with a 10,000mAh power source inside a durable aircraft aluminum body and a stainless steel bezel. The end cap removes to expose dual USB ports capable of charging multiple smartphones or tablets at once. The ZeroHour is also modular, letting you remove the recharging portion if you need something smaller in your pocket.