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LM Guest House

Set next to a pond in upstate New York, the LM Guest House is an award-winning mix of glass, steel, and wood. The structure was designed to be as sustainable as possible, and thus takes advantage of geothermal heating and cooling, radiant floors, motorized shading, solar panels, and rainwater harvesting. An open floor plan connects the living, kitchen, and sleeping areas, while a slatted wood core hides the mechanical systems, bathrooms, and storage. The entire facade is made of glass that was pre-fabricated off site, supported by a steel frame that cantilevers over the the living areas and provides contrast with the natural white oak detailing.

Photos: Paul Warchol / Desai Chia Architecture

  • Amagansett Dunes House

    Purposefully laid at an angle to capture the prevailing winds, the Amagansett Dunes House uses the natural breeze as ventilation. Helping matters are small, adjustable openings on the wind-facing side and larger apertures opposite, as well as canvas louvers that let in the summertime breeze while helping to block wintertime winds. The interior is clean and sparse, with plenty of natural light peppered by the aforementioned portholes, with the master suite and guest bed on the second floor, living and dining areas and another guest room on the ground floor, a spacious deck adjoining the kitchen and living room, and a roof deck accessible from upstairs offering loft views of the dunes and the water beyond.

    Photos: Bates Masi Architects

  • CCR1 Residence

    Set near the water of Texas' Cedar Creek Reservoir, the CCR1 Residence uses a slender, L-shaped plan to weave between trees planted by the owner when he was just a boy. The property includes a main house, a guest pavilion, storage, and various outdoor features like a stone wall along the entryway, a bocce court, and a sunken fire pit/courtyard. All the sleeping, living, and dining areas are set on a single floor and formed from a mix of concrete, steel, teak, and glass, with the lone vertical extension housing a treehouse retreat for the children in the family in keeping with the home's playful nature.

    Photos: Justin Clemons / Robert Yu