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Melbourne Loft

Filled with fluid forms and dramatic curves, a former butter factory was transformed into a modern work of art to house this unconventional Melbourne Loft. The open floor plan surrounds a museum-quality staircase that leads to a roofrop terrace overlooking the cityscape. A monochromatic palette gives the space a gallery feel to compliment the minimalist decor and sculpted walls, while highlighting the grey marble counters and dark, second-story wood floor. The original steel trusses were removed to accommodate an upper floor with two bedrooms, a bathroom and an optional studio to release the creativity this interior is sure to inspire.

Photos: Fraser Marsden / Adrian Amore Architects

  • Stamford House

    In a neighborhood filled with oversized homes, the Stamford House stands out not by the space it occupies, but the space it doesn't. The home, also referred to as That House, is constructed using three rectangular forms — two on the bottom, joined by an open walkway, that house the shared family space, with a kitchen, living room, office, and bathroom, and a single upper space straddling both to house the bedrooms. With floor-to-ceiling glass capping all three components on both sides, upwards blinds to give the owners control over their level of privacy, while a cross-shaped pool matches the angular design of the home itself.

    Photos: Austin Maynard Architects

  • Seehaus

    Built as a holiday home on the shores of a royal-owned lake not far from Vienna, the Seehaus uses its horseshoe-shaped structure to great effect. Inside the building, which is clad in blackened timber panels, are five bedrooms, multiple living areas and bathrooms, and a sauna, with plenty of glass on the northern side, and south-facing glazing limited to areas shadowed by the neighboring building. In the center is a patio/courtyard that provides plenty of outdoor living space, while providing views of the water and evening sunsets.

    Photos: Maximilian Eisenköck