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Neuros OSD Linux Media Recorder

Neuros OSD Linux Media Recorder

The Neuros OSD Linux Media Recorder ($215) is set to fix the annoyances of the MPEG4 Recorder 2 with an open-source, Linux-based interface. Currently a bounty hunter-style beta is going on to add functions such as streaming of YouTube and Google Video, Flickr browsing, and wireless remote capabilities, just to name a few. All of these features will be coded by community — and a nice little payment system Neuros has set up. With all of its pre-existing capabilities such as video recording at 720x480, MPEG-4, AVI, ASF, MP3, OGG, WMA, and AC3 encoding, ethernet, and a homebrew base that is sure to make the device even more useful than Neuros has foreseen, how can you not give it a try?

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