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Savion House

Connected by a 13-foot passage, the Savion House keeps private and public areas completely separate. The front cube contains a communal living room, kitchen, dining room, and a second-story study, with wide plank and concrete floors running throughout. The space is lined with floor-to-ceiling windows and doors for added light and access to the patio and pool. The three-story rear cube holds another living room, three bedrooms, and the master with a white pine bridge that leads to a library housed in the front wing. When joined together, the two concrete and steel forms create an unmistakable L-shape.

Photos: Amit Gosher / Neuman Hayner Architects

  • Glass Tree House

    Most treehouses are built from wood, and use the tree for support. Instead, this Glass Tree House fully encloses a tree inside its walls. The Apple-like curved glass cylinder houses a multi-level structure, accessed by a spiral staircase around the outside. There's a kitchen and bath on the ground floor, a living area above, a bedroom on the third level, and a fourth floor observation deck that provides 360-degree views of the surrounding forest, as well as the rare opportunity to view the top of the internal tree from up close. Obviously a concept, yet grounded just enough to conceivably get built.

    Photos: A.Masow Architects

  • Black Barn Conversion

    Built from a derelict farm in the hills outside Folkestone in Kent, the Black Barn Conversion melds what could be salvaged from the existing structure with an interesting mix of found materials. The centerpiece of the main area is a tapered brick chimney that supports both a portion of the mezzanine that houses the bed and bathrooms and a cantilevered waxed steel staircase. Huge insulated shutters recall the original barn doors while protecting an equally grand rotating window, and the original green oak framing — or the portion of it that could be repaired — is largely cosmetic, with a steel exoskeleton providing support for decades to come.

    Photos: Keith Collie and Will Scott / Liddicoat & Goldhill