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Stamford House

In a neighborhood filled with oversized homes, the Stamford House stands out not by the space it occupies, but the space it doesn't. The home, also referred to as That House, is constructed using three rectangular forms — two on the bottom, joined by an open walkway, that house the shared family space, with a kitchen, living room, office, and bathroom, and a single upper space straddling both to house the bedrooms. With floor-to-ceiling glass capping all three components on both sides, upwards blinds to give the owners control over their level of privacy, while a cross-shaped pool matches the angular design of the home itself.

Photos: Austin Maynard Architects

  • Studio Franz Messner

    Some great ideas appear when an architectural firm turns its eye on its own workshop. Such is the case with Studio Franz Messner. A renovated Italian studio that's home to Messner Architects, it respects the original structure while transforming it into a suitable workspace. Two walls running parallel to each other create a storage area in the center of the building, with two mirrored workspaces — with lofts — on either side. More interesting are the "light-catchers" that sit above the two new windows, extending through the roof to harness the alpine daylight and redirect it into the space.

    Photos: Meraner Hauser

  • LM Guest House

    Set next to a pond in upstate New York, the LM Guest House is an award-winning mix of glass, steel, and wood. The structure was designed to be as sustainable as possible, and thus takes advantage of geothermal heating and cooling, radiant floors, motorized shading, solar panels, and rainwater harvesting. An open floor plan connects the living, kitchen, and sleeping areas, while a slatted wood core hides the mechanical systems, bathrooms, and storage. The entire facade is made of glass that was pre-fabricated off site, supported by a steel frame that cantilevers over the the living areas and provides contrast with the natural white oak detailing.

    Photos: Paul Warchol / Desai Chia Architecture