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Vampires, Werewolves, Zombies: Compendium Monstrum

Sized for travel and filled with the type of information usually reserved for travel and birdwatching guides, Vampires, Werewolves, Zombies: Compendium Monstrum ($10) is your pocketable encyclopedia of baddies. Spanning 160+ pages, this helpful guide includes sections on the aforementioned monsters, including a special section dedicated to travel within Transylvania, and features illustrations, maps, and historical images throughout to better illuminate the potentially life-saving text within.

  • Nintendo Magic: Winning the Videogame Wars

    In case you missed it, Nintendo wasn't in the best shape market share-wise when it announced the Wii: the PS2 was the undisputed king of consoles, the Xbox 360 had already launched with a well-received, if expensive online service, and Nintendo's prior console, the GameCube, was more or less a joke. Nintendo Magic: Winning the Videogame Wars ($14) is a business- and marketing-focused look at how the Wii managed to overcome these odds to become the king of this generation's consoles, explaining how Nintendo's unique company outlook and structure helped it along. Just beware the section on how the Wii will become a major household appliance and the DSi will be "the cell phone of the future" — we're pretty sure we've seen the cell phones of the future, and they sure as hell don't use styluses.

  • Cowboy: The Ultimate Guide to Living Like a Great American Icon

    While not as revered or celebrated as they once were — both in the movies and in pop culture *cough* Marlboro man *cough* —there is still a place for the classic western cowboy in modern society, and Cowboy: The Ultimate Guide to Living Like a Great American Icon ($10) is here to educate the masses on the lifestyle and day-to-day life of these near-mythical men. Packed with a variety of knowledge nuggets, including recipes, instruction, interviews, trivia, and photographs, this 200+ page guide will have you ropin' steers and chuckin' wagons in no time. Or something along those lines — just think Jack Palance in City Slickers and you'll get the idea.