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Oma Imperia Speakers

As much speakers as they are works of art, Oma Imperia Speakers look as impressive as they sound. Penned by industrial designer David D'Imperio, they're built by hand in Pennsylvania using your choice of black walnut, cherry, or ash. The four-way system uses a pair of wooden horns covering 100hz to 20khz, and two rear-loaded subwoofer horns fed by a 21" woofer that covers frequencies from 20hz to 100hz and is powered by its own solid-state amplifier. The result is a system that's entirely time-aligned, American made, and commands attention — it stands over seven feet tall and measures five feet deep, after all — with both its presence and its performance.

  • Sony Hi-Res USB Turntable

    Compressed digital files, whether purchased or streamed, simply can't compare with the rich, uncompressed analog sound of vinyl. But there is a happy medium, and the Sony PS-HX500 Hi-Res USB Turntable is made to take advantage. It uses a built-in analog-to-digital converter to turn your vinyl into high-resolution audio tracks in either DSD or WAV formats, outputting them to your PC or Mac via the aforementioned USB port, and thus enabling them to be used on pretty much any digital device you own. It's no slouch at playing records through a traditional system, either, with a rock-solid cabinet, belt drive system, lightweight tonearm with integrated shell for superior sound, and a built-in phono EQ that can be bypassed for use with an external rig.

  • McIntosh RS100 Wireless Speaker

    Stream wirelessly from any room in your home or office with the McIntosh RS100 Wireless Speaker. Get started with a single unit, which connects to Wi-Fi and is controlled from a mobile app available on Apple or Android. Over time, you can add up to 16 speakers on a single network, enough for playback in 8 different rooms. It supports just about every audio format, and provides lossless playback of up to 16-bit/48kHz files. The bookshelf style speaker also features an eye catching blue meter and knobs that make is unmistakably McIntosh.