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Pentax Q Camera

In a recent interview with Uncrate, the DSLR made its feelings known about the rising number of small, interchangeable lens cameras. Below is an excerpt from that talk.

"Doesn't anyone like big, heavy, highly-capable cameras anymore? All these new models are stealing my lens-swapping mojo while pushing around my longtime buddy, the point-and-shoot. Take the Pentax Q Camera ($800), for instance. It claims to be the world's smallest and lightest interchangeable lens camera — proud little prick — with a 12.4 megapixel, 1/2.3-inch CMOS sensor that it no doubt stole off one of my cousins, full Aperture/Shutter Priority and Manual modes, 1080p HD recording, 5 frames-per-second shooting, a Shake Reduction system, and 3-inch LCD. Well whoop-de-doo! Does it know how long I've worked to make all that possible? Does it even care? Effin' thing will probably end up outselling me someday. I need a drink."

  • Sony NEX-C3 Camera

    With a design that crams a DSLR-sized sensor into a point-and-shoot sized body, the Sony NEX-C3 Camera ($600-$650) is the latest in Sony's series of hybrid shooters. Building upon the company's well-received NEX-3, the C3 features a solid metal top case, a streamlined grip, a 16.2 megapixel Exmor APS HD CMOS sensor, 720p video recording, a tilting, three-inch LCD, 3D Sweep Panorama and Auto HDR modes, and a weight of just eight ounces, or less than your typical prime lens for your comparatively huge DLSR.

    Our thanks to Gillette for sponsoring our mobile articles this month.

  • Lomo LC-Wide Camera

    Analog photography, like vinyl, is making a huge comeback — and you can get in on the action with the Lomo LC-Wide Camera ($390). Sporting a fixed 17mm Minigon Ultra-Wide Angle lens, the LC-Wide shoots on pretty much any type of 35mm film, and offers a choice between full, square, or half-format shots, multiple exposures, a close-up focus distance of just 0.4 meters, auto exposure, zone-based focusing, and a maximum shutter speed of 1/500. A new DSLR it's not, but that's entirely the point.