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1960 Chevrolet Engineering CERV 1 Research Vehicle

Developed as a research tool for Chevrolet's efforts to better understand ride and handling on vehicles, this 1960 Chevrolet Engineering CERV 1 Research Vehicle is often called one of the most important pieces of American automotive history. Chevy staff engineer, designer, and race car driver Zora Arkus-Duntov is responsible for the initial development and unveiled it in November of 1960. It recorded a top speed of 206 mph and even did some demo laps at the 1960 U.S. Grand Prix. This model features four-wheel independent suspension, a 4-speed manual transmission, and front disc and rear drum brakes. It arrives at auction in fantastic shape providing collectors with a rare opportunity to own a piece of GM history.

  • 1995 Ferrari F50

    Only 349 F50s were built. Only 55 made their way to the States. Only two of those were Nero black. And the other one wrecked. Which makes this 1995 Ferrari F50 the only pristine US-spec example left, and one of only three remaining Nero examples worldwide. Powered by a 4.7L naturally aspirated V12 engine mated to a six-speed manual gearbox, it produces 520 hp, enough to propel the mostly carbon fiber vehicle from 0-60 in just 3.6 seconds, on its way to a top speed of 202 mph. It's been continuously cared for by its owners, has less than 2,100 miles on the odometer, and thanks to a recent servicing, is in showroom condition. It arrives with a host of original accessories, including its original hardtop in its box, the unused canvas top, three pieces of unopened factory luggage, and its custom car cover.

  • 2004 Ford GT Prototype CP-1

    The first fully-functional prototype built as part of the all-new GT's development, this 2004 Ford GT Prototype CP-1 is a highly unique ride. Since it was built early in development, it has a number of features not found on later models, including a carbon fiber rear clamshell, experimental exhaust pipes, silver trim on the seats, an all-aluminum headliner, and a steering column from a Windstar van. It also bears the signatures of the original design and development team, including those of Bill Ford, Chief Designer Camillo Pardo, and Carroll Shelby. While it has a fully-functional powertrain, it's been outfitted with a chip that limits its top speed to 5 mph, making it highly collectible, but not a relic you'll be enjoying on the track.