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2011 Porsche 911 GT2 RS

For the recent lotto winners, professional athletes, and CEOs in the crowd, here's the 2011 Porsche 911 GT2 RS ($245,000). The most powerful road-legal Porsche, it's fueled by a 3.6-liter engine producing 620 hp, good for a 0-60 time of 3.4 seconds and a top speed of 205 mph, with composite ceramic brakes to bring you back down to earth, helped along by 19-inch wheels sheathed in custom rubber created specifically for the GT2 RS. Other features include a black and red Alcantara interior, carbon fiber bodywork, adaptive suspension management, and the feeling that comes with knowing you're one of only 500 people on earth who get to call one your own.

  • Ferrari 599 GTO

    It looks fast because it is fast. In fact, the Ferrari 599 GTO (~$480,000) is the company's fastest road car ever. Powered by a 6.0-liter V12, this sexy beast gives you 670 hp, a top speed over 208 mph, and a 0-60 time of 3.35 seconds. The 599 GTO shed every ounce of weight it could, coming in at only 3,295 lbs, making handling and acceleration crazier than a video game. It rolls on 20-inch rims and comes equipped with carbon-ceramic brakes and Formula 1-derived wheel doughnuts for braking efficiency and optimized brake cooling. It's also got a rather futuristic driver-car interface with Virtual Race Engineer (VRE), which sends the driver "instantaneous information" on performance. Only 599 will be available. [Thanks, Dennis]

  • Ferris Bueller's Day Off Ferrari

    In one of the more disappointing developments in recent movie memorabilia memory, it turns out the Ferrari 250GT Spyder California made famous in Ferris Bueller's Day Off wasn't really a Ferrari. Better news? If you have the means, you can now pick it up for yourself. The Ferris Bueller's Day Off Ferrari ($TBA; Auction) is actually a painstakingly built replica, made by Modena Design & Development, of El Cajon, California in 1985. Apart from having the same wheelbase as the original, much has changed in this convincing recreation, all the way down to its engine — a Ford V8 instead of the original Colombo-designed V12. Now that is disappointing.