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Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport

Want to own the fastest production car ever built? Then prepare to pony up the mountains of cash it will take to get you the Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport ($TBA). With its 16-cylinder, turbocharged and intercooled engine tuned to produce 1,200 hp — nearly 200 more than the typical Veyron 16.4, if there is such a thing — this world-beater offers lateral acceleration of up to 1.4G, carbon-fiber composite body panels, central rear exhaust system, and a top speed of 257.9 mph, which is less than the 267.8 it averaged when taking the production car land speed record, but is certainly enough to outrun the local police should you get in trouble for exercising your need for speed.

  • Jaguar XKR 75

    Created to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the British luxury car maker, the Jaguar XKR 75 (£85,500; roughly $130,000) is a limited edition version of the company's stylish sports coupe. Powered by a 5.0L supercharged engine, the XKR 75 boasts 530hp — 20 more than its standard-edition sibling — that propels it from 0-60 in just 4.4 seconds, moving on to a top speed of 174 mph. Features include upgraded suspension systems, active front lighting, 20-inch Vortex dark gray alloy wheels, red brake calipers, "Stratus Gray" exterior paint, and an optional graphics pack with stylish white striping. Limited to just 75 models, it's bound to be a collector's item — assuming you can keep your foot off the gas.

  • 2011 Porsche 911 GT2 RS

    For the recent lotto winners, professional athletes, and CEOs in the crowd, here's the 2011 Porsche 911 GT2 RS ($245,000). The most powerful road-legal Porsche, it's fueled by a 3.6-liter engine producing 620 hp, good for a 0-60 time of 3.4 seconds and a top speed of 205 mph, with composite ceramic brakes to bring you back down to earth, helped along by 19-inch wheels sheathed in custom rubber created specifically for the GT2 RS. Other features include a black and red Alcantara interior, carbon fiber bodywork, adaptive suspension management, and the feeling that comes with knowing you're one of only 500 people on earth who get to call one your own.