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Lazareth LM847 Quad Motorcycle

Most motorbikes don't have four wheels. Most aren't powered by Maserati engines, either. Both are defining features of the Lazareth LM847 Quad Motorcycle, essentially a sport bike built around a 4.7L V8 producing 470 hp. Despite its massive engine, it has all the properties you'd expect in a bike, such as handlebars, a low-slung saddle, the ability to lean — at least a little — in the turns, and distinctive headlamps.

  • Revival BMW Landspeeder Motorcycle

    Based on the record-breaking 1928 BMW R37 ridden by Ernst Henne, this Revival BMW Landspeeder Motorcycle is a modern interpretation of a legendary racing bike. Built to perform yet destined for life in a private gallery, it features an airhead engine that was rebuilt anyway, set lower than the original, and this time in a frame built from flat-cut steel instead of tubing. There's no lights, battery, or alternator, since racing and/or display bikes don't need them. Nor do they need brakes, so the straight spokes in the front and solid wheel cover in the rear appear unadorned. Finally, there's the stainless steel exhaust system with browned pipes, a reminder that while it might not take you to the store and back, it's got a growl every bit as formidable as any chopper down the street.

  • Fonzie's 1949 Triumph Trophy 500 Motorcycle

    Everyone old enough to remember Happy Days knows how iconic Henry Winkler's "The Fonz" was. Now you can own his ride. Originally built by Hollywood bike legend Bud Ekins and one of only three used on the show, Fonzie's 1949 Triumph Trophy 500 Motorcycle is the ultimate piece of fan memorabilia. Fully documented when it was auction by Bonhams several years back, the 500cc model has buckhorn handlebars, a silver gas tank, and a removed front fender, and is completely unrestored, bearing all the scars it earned during filming. The downside? If you want the matching motorcycle jacket, you're going to have to break into the Smithsonian to get it.