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LG Curved OLED TV

For years we haven't seen much innovation in TVs beyond growing screen sizes and shrinking costs — but that all changes with the LG Curved OLED TV ($15,000). The first organic LED display to hit the United States market, it passes electrical current through a biological substance that glows without a backlight. This gives it the truest blacks and most vibrant colors of any display, while maintaining a 4.3 mm thickness and 38 pound weight (unheard-of for a 55-inch screen). Couple that with a curved design that delivers an I-Max-like experience, 3D tech, and smart TV functionality, and you've got one hell of an addition to your living room.

  • Logitech Harmony Ultimate Remote

    Not satisfied with the IR-only capabilities of the Logitech Harmony Touch? Feast your eyes on the Logitech Harmony Ultimate Remote ($350). True to its grandiose name, this powerhouse might look a lot like the Touch, but uses RF signals to communicate with a Hub that in turn issues signals over Infrared and Bluetooth to everything from TVs to PS3s. It also controls Philips Hue lights, and offers its own 2.4" touchscreen — but if you'd rather use something a bit larger, you can download the Harmony app and control the whole show from your smartphone or tablet.

  • Sony X1 4K Media Player

    We're still a ways off from 4K being mainstream, so if you're one of the lucky few with a 4K-capable set and a dearth of content to show on it, the Sony X1 4K Media Player ($700) should be able to help. Arriving this summer, the player will come pre-loaded with 10 movies of varying quality, ranging from the Adam Sandler/Andy Samberg horror show That's My Boy to all-time classic Taxi Driver. Perhaps more importantly, that content is only there to tide you over until Sony's distribution service launches later in the year, giving you fee-based access to content from Sony Pictures and the always mysterious "other notable production houses". Still, it beats watching upscaled 1080p content — unless we're talking about Battle: Los Angeles, in which case we'd rather watch 480p reruns of Coach off of Netflix.