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Toyota Setsuna Concept

Some concept cars are production-ready. The Toyota Setsuna Concept is not one of them. As much an art project as it is a viable production car, this two-seater resembles a boat, and not just in its shape. The majority of the vehicle is built using wood, with different types being used for the various parts — including Japanese cedar for the exterior panels and Japanese birch for the frame. It's powered by an electric motor, but details such as this are irrelevant when talking about a car that's assembled using a traditional Japanese joinery technique that forgoes nails and screws, and that has a 100-year meter inside to help gauge and appreciate the wood's aging process.

  • Ferrari F80 Concept

    Imagined as the successor to the LaFerrari, Italian designer Adriano Raeli's Ferrari F80 Concept keeps the long nose and wind-funneling rear of its predecessors while making a curious change to the powerplant. Instead of relying on a V12 engine, as Maranello's prior flagship steeds have done, the F80 uses Ferrari's KERS technology to coax a hypothetical 1,200 horses from a twin-turbo hybrid V8. Raeli expects that power to be good for a 0-62 time of 2.2 seconds, and a top speed of 310 mph, fast enough to earn a spot among the fastest production cars of all time — assuming it ever gets built.

  • Nissan Rogue Warrior Snow Track Crossover

    Forget studded tires or chains — when you need the capability to get pretty much anywhere in the harshest of wintry conditions, you need tracks. Like the ones on the Nissan Rogue Warrior Snow Track Crossover. This snow-centric concept has seen its wheels replaced by a Dominator track system measuring 15" across, 30" high, and 48" long. Joining the tracks are a modified suspension, custom snow guards, and minor body tunings, but apart from that the Rogue remains stock, including its Xtronic transmission and AWD drivetrain. Capable of hitting 62 mph in groomed snow, it has a 23" ground clearance, and will be on a lot of wish lists when the next big snow hits.