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Volkswagen Cross Coupe Concept

Today's edition of "Concept Cars We'd Buy Right Now" comes to you courtesy of the Volkswagen Cross Coupe Concept ($TBA). Based on Veedub's new modular transverse matrix platform, the Cross Coupe is actually smaller than the current Tiguan despite its muscular stance, and offers all-wheel-drive, a hybrid power system consisting of two electric motors and a turbocharged gas engine that's good for 262 hp and an electric range of up to 25 miles, 20-inch wheels, LED foglights, a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission with an oversized aluminum shift lever, and, of course, a touchscreen to monitor and control most vehicle functions. Arriving in dealerships (hopefully) sooner rather than later.

  • 1969 Holden Hurricane

    Sometimes the future invented by the past is even more exciting than the one we're actually living. The 1969 Holden Hurricane ($TBA) is a perfect example. Originally unveiled at the 1969 Melbourne Motor Show, this sleek ride featured a mid-mounted, 262hp V8 engine boasting advanced components such as the four-barrel carburetor, rear-wheel drive, a glorious fold-forward windshield assembly in lieu of doors, and "futuristic" features like electronic digital instrument displays, a radio with seek capability, automatic temperature control, a rear-vision camera, and a quasi-GPS system called the "Pathfinder". Come to think of it, that sounds an awful lot like the present — only most of our cars aren't this good looking.

  • 1969 BMW Spicup

    And you thought a matter of months was a long time to wait for a concept car to become real. The 1969 BMW Spicup ($TBA) has been hidden away for over 20 years — after nearly as many years of use — only recently rearing its futurism-from-the-past head at an auction. Features include a 2.8L SOHC straight-six engine, a retractable roof — novel for the time — designed by Enzo Cingolani, and a completely restored body and interior that replaces some... interesting design choices, such as rust-friendly untreated metal body panels and termite-attracting wooden bumpers.