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Lucra L148

It seems like everywhere you look these days, some American boutique carmaker is introducing their take on a track-ready, lightweight super car — and the Lucra L148 ($250,000) is the latest in that crop. But don't get it wrong, we're definitely not complaining. If there's anything the guys in Detroit need, it's a little bit of smalltime competition to push them in the right direction. The second of the California company's cars, the L148, should definitely turn a few Michigan heads. With a 4.7-liter V8 engine underneath the hood, and an aerodynamic body entirely crafted from carbon fiber, this hot two-seater will do zero to 60 in just 2.5 seconds, with an estimated 500 horsepower.

  • Nissan GT-R Nismo

    The Nissan GT-R Nismo ($TBA) provides indisputable proof that you don't need to drop damn near a million bucks for a track-ready supercar. Underneath the hood, you'll find a 3.8-liter turbocharged V6 engine producing a ridiculous 600 horsepower and 481 pound-feet of torque, making it the fastest GT-R to date. A race-inspired suspension setup, exclusive Dunlop tires, a more rigid body structure, and significantly-improved aerodynamics make it an impressive beast on and off the track. Inside you'll find carbon-fiber Recaro racing seats, Alcantara details throughout, and red accents to dress it up. Overall what you get is an incredible sports car that's barely slower than rides likely costing four times its price. Not too shabby.

  • Lamborghini Veneno Roadster

    Say what you will about the bizarre styling of the Lamborghini Veneno Roadster ($4.5 million) — it's a Lamborghini after all — but we challenge you to find a single negative thing to say about the 750 horsepower 6.5-liter V12 around back. This small-batch exotic (based on the slightly less expensive Veneno coupe) is limited to just nine cars, so chances are you won't run into too many out on the road. It's built to be lightweight and highly aerodynamic, with carbon fiber construction and a range of angular surfaces to control airflow. Its massive engine pushes it up to a staggering 220 miles per hour, while it reaches 62 in only 2.9 seconds. So, if you do see one it'll probably be moving too fast to give you a chance at criticizing its looks.